A Caribbean Treasure: Unveiling the Secrets of Dominica Food

Take Me to the Recipes

Dominica, the “Nature Island” of the Caribbean, boasts a rich tapestry of flavors that goes far beyond its stunning scenery. Discover the vibrant and diverse flavors of Dominica Food, a true reflection of the island’s rich history, stunning geography, and unique climate.

Join us as we explore how Dominica’s past and present shape its food culture, creating a delicious tapestry that is as colorful and dynamic as the island itself. Whether you’re a food enthusiast or a curious traveler, Dominica’s cuisine offers a feast for both the palate and the soul.

Get ready to embark on a delicious journey as we explore how Dominica’s unique history, geography, and tropical climate have shaped its unforgettable cuisine.

Take Me to the Recipes





Savor iconic Dominica’s Food Dishes – Click on each tantalizing picture to open up the Recipe


10 Interesting Facts about Dominica

1. Home to the Boiling Lake

Dominica boasts the world’s second-largest boiling lake, a natural marvel that’s as eerie as it is fascinating. This volcanic lake, heated by underlying magma, reaches temperatures that can make the water bubble and steam.

2. The Land of 365 Rivers

Known as the “Nature Isle of the Caribbean,” Dominica is home to an astonishing 365 rivers, one for every day of the year. This abundance of freshwater sources contributes to the island’s lush landscapes and vibrant ecosystems.

3. Whale Watching Haven

Dominica is one of the best places in the world for whale watching. The deep waters off its coast are a year-round home to sperm whales, making it a prime destination for marine wildlife enthusiasts.

4. No Chains Allowed

You won’t find any international fast-food chains in Dominica. The government promotes local cuisine and businesses, ensuring that the island’s culinary heritage remains intact and thrives.

5. Home to the Kalinago Territory

Dominica hosts the Caribbean’s only remaining indigenous community, the Kalinago. This territory preserves the culture, traditions, and way of life of the island’s original inhabitants.

6. A Haven for Hikers

Dominica is a paradise for hikers, offering trails that range from easy walks to challenging treks. The Waitukubuli National Trail, spanning the entire island, is the longest hiking trail in the Caribbean.

7. Caribbean’s Tallest Mountain

Mountains dominate Dominica’s landscape, with Morne Diablotins standing as the highest peak in the Eastern Caribbean at 4,747 feet. It’s a hotspot for adventurous hikers seeking breathtaking views.

8. Unusual Currency

Dominica uses the Eastern Caribbean dollar (XCD), which features Queen Elizabeth II’s image despite the island being an independent republic since 1978. This currency is shared with seven other Caribbean nations.

9. Natural Disaster Resilience

Despite being frequently hit by hurricanes, Dominica showcases incredible resilience. The island has made remarkable strides in recovery and rebuilding efforts, especially after Hurricane Maria in 2017.

10. Batibou Beach’s Mystique

Batibou Beach, often considered one of the most beautiful beaches in the Caribbean, is somewhat of a hidden gem. Access to this pristine beach requires navigating through private property, adding an element of adventure to the visit.

Dominica’s History and the Effect It Has Had on the Cuisine  

Dominica, the “Nature Island” of the Caribbean, boasts not just stunning landscapes but also a cuisine as rich and diverse as its history. Let’s embark on a delicious adventure, exploring how each era has shaped the unique flavors Dominica offers today!

Pre-Columbian Spice

Our journey begins with the Kalinago people, who arrived in the 14th century. They called the island “Wai’tu kubuli,” meaning “Tall is her body,” a fitting name for this mountainous paradise.

These indigenous peoples laid the foundation for Dominican cuisine with their use of cassava (a starchy root vegetable), peppers, and a focus on fresh seafood.

French Flair (1715-1763)

Fast forward to the 17th century. The French arrived, drawn by Dominica’s valuable timber resources. They established settlements and brought enslaved people from West Africa, introducing new ingredients and cooking techniques.

French influence is evident in the use of spices, stews, and decadent desserts.

A British Twist (1763-1978)

The Seven Years’ War (1756-1763) saw Dominica change hands, becoming a British colony. While French traditions remained strong, British staples like potatoes, peas, and onions found their way onto Dominican plates.

Coffee and other crops were also introduced by the British, further enriching the island’s culinary landscape.

Independence and Beyond (1978-Present)

In 1978, Dominica gained independence, and its cuisine continues to celebrate its vibrant heritage. Today, Dominican meals are a delightful tapestry of Kalinago, African, French, and English influences.

Local ingredients like plantains, yams, and rice reign supreme, accompanied by chicken, fish, and beef. Dominica’s fertile soil also yields a bounty of exotic fruits, making fresh juices and desserts a true treat.

Dominica’s cuisine is more than just food; it’s a journey through time, reflecting the rich tapestry of cultures that have called this island home.

References

How Dominica’s Climate and Geography has Influenced the Cuisine  

This volcanic gem boasts a unique geography and climate that have played a starring role in shaping its vibrant cuisine. Get ready to explore how Dominica’s location, mountains, and tropical weather have cooked up a delicious adventure for your taste buds!

Volcanic Bounty

Dominica’s fiery past as a volcanic island has blessed it with fertile soils enriched by volcanic ash. These mineral-rich lands are the foundation for the island’s abundant vegetation and diverse range of fruits, vegetables, and herbs.

Every bite is a testament to nature’s culinary magic!

Mountains that Mold Flavor

Dominica’s dramatic peaks aren’t just a feast for the eyes. These mountains create a fascinating network of microclimates, with cooler areas at higher elevations and warmer zones down by the coast.

This variety allows a wide range of crops and herbs to flourish, adding complexity and depth to Dominican cuisine.

Heat from the Earth

Dominica’s volcanic activity isn’t just a historical footnote. The island is dotted with hot springs, fumaroles (volcanic vents), and even a boiling lake!

While these geothermal wonders might sound intimidating, they’ve actually influenced traditional cooking methods. Imagine simmering a stew naturally heated by the earth’s core – now that’s some serious geothermal gastronomy!

Tropical Paradise, Culinary Inspiration

Dominica basks in a year-round tropical climate, with warm temperatures and plenty of rain. The island experiences a distinct wet and dry season, with the rainy season bringing life-giving moisture for agriculture.

This abundance of rain translates to an explosion of fresh, local ingredients that form the basis of Dominican cuisine.

A Fusion of Flavors

Dominica’s cuisine reflects its rich cultural tapestry, with influences from the indigenous Kalinago people, African traditions, French flair, and a touch of English charm. While dishes are relatively consistent across the island, there are some delightful regional variations:

  • Coastal Feast: Life by the sea means fresh seafood takes center stage. Expect to savor delicious fish, lobster, and other ocean treats, often prepared with the delicate touch of coconut milk and grated coconut.
  • Mountain Delights: Venture inland and you’ll find hearty stews and side dishes featuring root vegetables like yams, tania, and plantains. Aromatic herbs like thyme, basil, and oregano add a touch of freshness, reflecting the cooler mountain climate.
  • Plains and Provisions: The fertile plains, nourished by rivers like the Layou, are ideal for growing crops like rice, potatoes, and peas. This region is also known for its hearty callaloo soup, a comforting dish made with leafy greens, salted meat, and the ever-present coconut milk.

References

  1. Britannica: Dominica | Facts, Geography, History
  2. Wikipedia: Geography of Dominica
  3. World Travel Guide: Dominica Weather, Climate, and Geography

Understanding the Essence of Dominica Cuisine  

Dominica’s cuisine is a vibrant tapestry of flavors and influences, making it stand out in the Caribbean culinary landscape. What sets Dominican food apart is its unique blend of cultural heritage, fresh local ingredients, and traditional cooking methods that have been passed down through generations.

Here’s a closer look at what makes Dominica’s cuisine so distinct and delightful.

A Melting Pot of Cultures

Dominica’s cuisine is a rich fusion of African, European, and indigenous influences. The island’s history of colonization and migration has left an indelible mark on its food.

African slaves brought their culinary traditions, which melded with the cooking styles of the French and British colonizers. The indigenous Kalinago people also contributed their knowledge of local ingredients and traditional cooking methods.

This cultural amalgamation creates a unique and diverse food landscape that is both flavorful and deeply rooted in history.

Fresh and Local Ingredients

One of the defining features of Dominican cuisine is its reliance on fresh, locally sourced ingredients. The island’s fertile volcanic soil and abundant rainfall produce a wide variety of fruits, vegetables, and spices.

From plantains and breadfruit to dasheen and yams, the bounty of the land is evident in every meal. Dominica’s surrounding waters also provide a rich supply of seafood, including fish, crab, and lobster, which are staples in many dishes.

This focus on fresh, local produce ensures that every bite is packed with natural flavors and nutrients.

Traditional Cooking Methods

Dominican cooking methods are a blend of simplicity and tradition, often involving slow-cooking techniques that enhance the flavors of the ingredients. One such method is the use of coal pots, which are traditional clay stoves that impart a unique smoky taste to the food.

Another popular technique is one-pot cooking, where all ingredients are combined and cooked together, allowing the flavors to meld beautifully. Dishes like callaloo soup, goat water, and sancoche are perfect examples of how traditional cooking methods create hearty, flavorful meals.

Spice and Flavor

Spices play a crucial role in Dominican cuisine, adding depth and warmth to every dish. Local spices such as thyme, bay leaves, cloves, and nutmeg are commonly used, along with fresh herbs like cilantro and parsley.

The use of hot peppers, particularly the scotch bonnet, adds a fiery kick to many dishes, balancing the richness of the ingredients with a spicy heat. This careful blend of spices and herbs creates a complex flavor profile that is both exciting and comforting.

Celebrating Diversity Through Food

Dominica’s cuisine is a celebration of the island’s cultural diversity and natural abundance. Each dish tells a story, reflecting the history and heritage of the people who have called this island home.

Whether it’s the African-inspired pepperpot, the French-influenced bakes and accras, or the indigenous cassava bread, the food of Dominica is a testament to the island’s rich cultural tapestry.

Exploring Dominica Ingredients: The Flavors of Dominica Cuisine  

Dominica’s cuisine is a rich tapestry of flavors and textures, deeply rooted in the island’s abundant natural resources. The main ingredients used in Dominican cooking reflect the island’s fertile soil, diverse ecosystems, and cultural heritage.

Let’s dive into the essential components that make Dominican food so unique and delicious.

Fresh Seafood

Surrounded by the Caribbean Sea, Dominica boasts an incredible variety of fresh seafood. Fish such as snapper, mahi-mahi, and tuna are staples in many dishes. Lobster, crab, and conch are also popular and are often prepared in hearty stews or grilled to perfection.

The island’s fishermen bring in daily catches, ensuring that seafood dishes are always fresh and flavorful.

Root Vegetables

Root vegetables are a cornerstone of Dominican cuisine. Taro (known locally as dasheen), yams, sweet potatoes, and cassava are commonly used in various dishes.

These starchy vegetables are versatile and can be boiled, mashed, fried, or added to soups and stews, providing a hearty base and rich texture to meals.

Tropical Fruits

Dominica’s tropical climate produces an abundance of fruits that add a burst of flavor and color to the local cuisine. Mangoes, bananas, pineapples, and guavas are just a few examples of the fruits that are used both in savory dishes and desserts.

Passion fruit and soursop are often turned into refreshing drinks, while coconuts provide milk, oil, and flesh used in cooking and baking.

Leafy Greens

Leafy greens like callaloo (a type of amaranth) and spinach are integral to Dominican cooking. Callaloo soup, a local favorite, features these greens cooked with okra, onions, and various meats or seafood.

These greens are not only nutritious but also add a vibrant green color and earthy flavor to many dishes.

Beans and Legumes

Beans and legumes, such as pigeon peas, red beans, and black-eyed peas, are essential components of Dominican cuisine. These protein-rich ingredients are often featured in rice dishes, soups, and stews.

Rice and peas, a classic Caribbean dish, is a staple on the island, showcasing the perfect blend of beans, rice, and spices.

Spices and Herbs

Spices and herbs are the heart and soul of Dominican cuisine, infusing dishes with bold and complex flavors. Thyme, bay leaves, cilantro, parsley, and chives are commonly used fresh from local gardens. Hot peppers, particularly scotch bonnets, add a fiery kick to many recipes.

Nutmeg, cloves, and cinnamon are used to enhance both savory and sweet dishes, reflecting the island’s rich spice heritage.

Breadfruit

Breadfruit is a versatile and beloved ingredient in Dominica. This large, starchy fruit can be roasted, boiled, or fried and is often served as a side dish or used in stews.

Its unique texture and mild flavor make it a perfect canvas for absorbing the rich spices and seasonings typical of Dominican cuisine.

Plantains and Bananas

Plantains and bananas are ubiquitous in Dominican cooking. Green plantains are often fried or boiled, while ripe plantains can be grilled or used in sweet dishes.

Bananas, another staple, are used in everything from snacks to elaborate desserts, highlighting the versatility of these fruits.

Coconut

This is an indispensable ingredient in Dominica’s cuisine. Coconut milk is used to add richness to soups, stews, and rice dishes, while grated coconut is often used in desserts and baked goods.

Coconut oil, widely used for frying and cooking, imparts a subtle yet distinct flavor to many dishes.

Dominica’s National Food  

Dominica, the “Nature Island” of the Caribbean, boasts a cuisine as vibrant and diverse as its landscape. But one dish reigns supreme: the luscious and soul-satisfying Callaloo Soup.

Declared the official national dish in 2013, Callaloo is more than just a meal; it’s a culinary journey through Dominica’s history and cultural tapestry.

A Fusion of Flavors

Callaloo’s roots trace back to West Africa, where a similar dish is prepared with leafy greens. Arriving in Dominica with enslaved Africans, this dish found new life with the addition of local ingredients.

Dominica’s indigenous Kalinago people contributed cassava, while the French introduced salted meats and the ever-present coconut milk. The result? A rich and flavorful soup that perfectly embodies Dominica’s multicultural heritage.

A Symphony of Ingredients

Dominican Callaloo is a symphony of fresh, local ingredients.

  • The foundation is built on lush, leafy greens like callaloo (similar to spinach) or dasheen bush.
  • Salted meats like bacon or ham add a savory depth.
  • Coconut milk provides a creamy richness.
  • Chopped vegetables like onions, peppers, and tomatoes infuse the soup with vibrant flavors.
  • No Dominican dish is complete without a touch of aromatic herbs like thyme and bay leaf.
  • Plump cornmeal dumplings nestled in the heart of the soup, offering a perfect textural contrast.

Exploring Dominica’s Street Food  

Dominica’s street food scene is a vibrant and flavorful journey through the island’s rich culinary traditions. As you wander through bustling markets and busy streets, the enticing aromas of freshly cooked food invite you to indulge in a variety of local delicacies.

Street vendors across Dominica offer a mouthwatering array of dishes that showcase the island’s diverse cultural influences and abundant natural ingredients. Let’s explore the vibrant street food scene and discover five common recipes sold by street vendors.

1. Accras (Fish Fritters)

Accras are delicious fish fritters that are a staple in Dominica’s street food scene. Made from salted cod, flour, and a blend of spices, these crispy fritters are deep-fried to perfection.

The addition of herbs like parsley and thyme, along with hot peppers, gives accras their distinctive flavor. They are often served with a tangy dipping sauce or hot pepper sauce, making them a favorite snack among locals and tourists alike.

2. Bakes and Saltfish

This is a beloved street food combo in Dominica. They are fluffy, fried dough balls that are slightly sweet. They are typically stuffed with saltfish, which is salted cod that has been sautéed with onions, tomatoes, and spices.

This savory and satisfying dish is perfect for breakfast or a quick snack, offering a delightful contrast between the soft bakes and the flavorful saltfish filling.

3. Callaloo Soup

Callaloo soup is a hearty and nutritious dish commonly found at street food stalls. Made with the leaves of the callaloo plant, this soup often includes ingredients such as okra, coconut milk, and various meats or seafood.

Street vendors prepare large pots of callaloo soup, ladling out steaming servings to hungry patrons. The rich, earthy flavors of the soup make it a comforting and popular choice, especially during the cooler months.

4. Roasted Breadfruit

Roasted breadfruit is a simple yet delicious street food that highlights one of Dominica’s staple crops. The breadfruit is roasted over an open flame until the skin is charred and the flesh is tender.

Once cooked, it is often served with a drizzle of coconut oil and a sprinkle of salt. This dish is enjoyed for its unique texture and mild flavor, making it a popular street food item throughout the island.

5. Johnny Cakes

Johnny cakes are another popular street food item in Dominica. These small, fried dough cakes are made from a simple mixture of flour, sugar, baking powder, and water.

They are crispy on the outside and soft on the inside, making them a perfect accompaniment to a variety of dishes. Street vendors often serve johnny cakes with fried fish, saltfish, or even alone as a tasty snack.

Dominica’s Cities with Vibrant Street Food Scenes

Several cities and towns in Dominica are known for their vibrant street food scenes, each offering a unique culinary experience.

Roseau

As the capital city, Roseau boasts the most bustling street food scene in Dominica. The city’s central market is a hotspot for street food vendors, offering everything from fresh produce to cooked meals.

The streets of Roseau come alive with the sounds and smells of sizzling food, making it a must-visit destination for food enthusiasts.

Portsmouth

Portsmouth, located in the northern part of the island, is another city with a thriving street food culture.

The town’s lively markets and streets are lined with vendors selling a variety of local dishes. Portsmouth is especially known for its seafood, given its proximity to rich fishing waters.

Marigot

Marigot, situated on the eastern coast, offers a more laid-back but equally vibrant street food scene.

This town is known for its fresh seafood and traditional dishes, providing a great opportunity to sample authentic Dominican cuisine in a relaxed setting.

Here are ten of the most popular recipes from Dominica, each a must-try for anyone looking to experience the island’s culinary delights.

1. Callaloo Soup

Callaloo soup is a traditional Dominican dish made from the leaves of the callaloo plant, similar to spinach. This hearty and nutritious soup often includes okra, coconut milk, and various meats or seafood. It’s a flavorful and comforting dish that’s perfect for any meal.

2. Accras (Fish Fritters)

Accras are crispy fish fritters made from salted cod, flour, and a mix of spices and herbs. These savory snacks are deep-fried to perfection and typically served with a tangy dipping sauce or hot pepper sauce. They are a popular street food and appetizer.

3. Bakes and Saltfish

Bakes are fluffy, fried dough balls that are slightly sweet. They are commonly paired with saltfish, which is salted cod sautéed with onions, tomatoes, and spices.

This combination makes for a delicious and satisfying meal, perfect for breakfast or a snack.

4. Goat Water

Goat water is a rich and flavorful stew made with goat meat, seasoned with a variety of spices and herbs.

This dish is simmered until the meat is tender and the flavors are well-blended, making it a hearty and comforting meal that’s popular across the island.

5. Sancoche

Sancoche is a thick, creamy soup made with a variety of root vegetables such as yams, sweet potatoes, and dasheen.

It often includes meat or fish and is flavored with coconut milk and spices. This soup is a staple in Dominican cuisine and is perfect for a hearty meal.

6. Pelau

Pelau is a one-pot rice dish that includes chicken, pigeon peas, and a variety of vegetables, all cooked together with spices and coconut milk. This dish is known for its rich, savory flavor and is a popular choice for gatherings and special occasions.

7. Titiri (River Fish Fritters)

Titiri are tiny river fish that are mixed with flour, spices, and herbs to create fritters. These are then deep-fried until crispy.

Titiri fritters are a beloved snack in Dominica, often enjoyed with a dipping sauce or as part of a meal.

8. Bread (Cassava)

This delightful bread is made from grated cassava root, which is pressed and baked into flat, round bread.

This traditional bread is a staple in many Dominican households and can be enjoyed with a variety of toppings or simply on its own.

9. Crab Backs

Crab backs are a delicacy in Dominica, made by stuffing crab meat back into the cleaned shells along with breadcrumbs, spices, and sometimes coconut milk.

These stuffed crab shells are then baked until golden and are often served as an appetizer.

10. Codfish Buljol

Codfish buljol is a light and refreshing dish made from salted cod that has been boiled and flaked, then mixed with fresh vegetables like tomatoes, onions, and bell peppers.

This mixture is seasoned with lime juice and olive oil, creating a vibrant and flavorful salad that is perfect as a side dish or light meal.

How Healthy is Dominica’s Food? 

 Dominica faces challenges in balancing delicious traditions with healthy choices. Let’s delve into the connection between Dominica’s diet and national health, exploring both potential concerns and areas for improvement.

Food Choices and Health Outcomes:

Our food choices have a profound impact on our well-being. Here’s where some aspects of the Dominican diet can influence health:

  • Cholesterol Imbalance: People with diabetes, a growing concern in Dominica, often experience high triglycerides and low “good” HDL cholesterol. This, known as diabetic dyslipidemia, increases the risk of heart attacks and strokes.
  • Dietary Culprits: Saturated and trans fats, commonly found in processed foods, fried items, and some animal products, can elevate bad (LDL) cholesterol levels.
  • The Power of Plants: Consuming antioxidant-rich fruits and vegetables, along with fiber-packed whole grains, plays a crucial role in maintaining heart health.
  • Metabolic Syndrome: This condition, where diabetes, high blood pressure, and high cholesterol co-exist, is often linked to dietary factors and raises the risk of heart disease.

Dominica’s Population Health Snapshot:

With a population of approximately 73,037 (3), Dominica’s demographics are shifting. As of 2023, over 13% are above 60. This aging population requires a focus on preventative health measures. Here are some key health concerns:

  • High Blood Pressure: Dominica sees a high prevalence of hypertension, a major risk factor for heart disease.
  • Diabetes: Dominica faces challenges with diabetes, which can worsen cholesterol profiles and increase the risk of heart disease and stroke.
  • Chronic Respiratory Diseases: These conditions, like chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, are leading causes of illness and disability in Dominica (4).

References

  1. The Borgen Project: The 5 Deadliest Common Diseases in Dominica
  2. World Health Organization: Dominica Health Data Overview
  3. American Heart Association: Diabetes and Cholesterol
  4. Kaiser Permanente: How Diabetes Can Affect Your Heart
  5. Bidmc: Type 2 Diabetes and Cholesterol

Dominica’s Cuisine Recipes to Try at Home 

Embark on a culinary adventure with Dominica’s rich and diverse cuisine, right from the comfort of your own kitchen. This chapter brings you a collection of detailed recipes that capture the essence of Dominica’s vibrant food culture.

From hearty soups and savory stews to crispy fritters and tropical desserts, these recipes will transport your taste buds to the heart of the Caribbean. Whether you’re a seasoned cook or a curious foodie, you’ll find step-by-step instructions and tips to help you recreate these delicious Dominican dishes at home.

Get ready to explore new flavors and enjoy a taste of Dominica’s culinary heritage.

Dominica Food – Calypso Chicken (Flavorful Stew) 

Dominica Food - Calypso Chicken (Flavorful Stew) 
Calypso Chicken (Flavorful Stew) 

History and Background

Calypso Chicken hails from the beautiful island of Dominica in the Caribbean. This dish is inspired by the vibrant and lively culture of the island, where calypso music fills the air and the flavors of the food are just as dynamic.

Dominica, known for its lush rainforests and stunning beaches, brings together African, French, and indigenous Kalinago influences in its cuisine. Calypso Chicken is a testament to this rich cultural blend, offering a taste of the island’s history and its tropical, warm climate.

Dominica Food – Calypso Chicken Ingredients

Chicken Marinade:

  • 2 pounds of chicken thighs or breasts, cut into pieces
  • 2 tablespoons lime juice
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1 teaspoon black pepper
  • 1 teaspoon paprika
  • 1 teaspoon thyme
  • 1 teaspoon garlic powder
  • 1 teaspoon onion powder

Stew:

  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1 large onion, chopped
  • 3 garlic cloves, minced
  • 1 bell pepper, chopped
  • 2 tomatoes, chopped
  • 1 cup coconut milk
  • 1 cup chicken broth
  • 1 teaspoon curry powder
  • 1 teaspoon allspice
  • 1/2 teaspoon cayenne pepper (optional for heat)
  • 2 cups diced potatoes
  • 1 cup sliced carrots
  • 1 cup green beans, chopped
  • 2 tablespoons fresh parsley, chopped

Dominica Food – Calypso Chicken Cooking Instructions

Marinating the Chicken:

  1. Prepare the Marinade:
    • In a large bowl, mix the lime juice, olive oil, salt, black pepper, paprika, thyme, garlic powder, and onion powder.
  2. Marinate the Chicken:
    • Add the chicken pieces to the bowl and coat them well with the marinade.
    • Cover the bowl and refrigerate for at least 1 hour, or overnight for the best flavor.

Making the Stew:

  1. Sautéing the Vegetables:
    • In a large pot, heat 2 tablespoons of olive oil over medium heat.
    • Add the chopped onion and garlic, and sauté until they are soft and fragrant.
    • Add the bell pepper and tomatoes, and cook for another 5 minutes.
  2. Cooking the Chicken:
    • Add the marinated chicken pieces to the pot.
    • Cook until the chicken is browned on all sides.
  3. Creating the Stew Base:
    • Pour in the coconut milk and chicken broth.
    • Add the curry powder, allspice, and cayenne pepper (if using).
    • Stir well to combine all the ingredients.
  4. Adding Vegetables and Simmering:
    • Add the diced potatoes, sliced carrots, and chopped green beans to the pot.
    • Bring the stew to a boil, then reduce the heat to low.
    • Cover the pot and let it simmer for 30-40 minutes, or until the chicken is cooked through and the vegetables are tender.
  5. Finishing Touches:
    • Stir in the fresh parsley.
    • Taste the stew and adjust the seasoning if needed.

Enjoy your flavorful journey to Dominica with this delicious Calypso Chicken stew!


Dominica Food – Reef Chicken (Chicken Marinated in A Rum) 

Dominica Food - Reef Chicken (Chicken Marinated in A Rum)
Reef Chicken (Chicken Marinated in A Rum)

History and Background

Reef Chicken comes from the tropical paradise of Dominica in the Caribbean. Known for its lush landscapes, clear waters, and vibrant culture, Dominica brings a unique blend of flavors to its cuisine.

This dish is inspired by the island’s love for rum, a staple in many Caribbean households. Rum, made from sugarcane, adds a rich, sweet flavor to the chicken, giving it a taste of the islands. The combination of local spices and rum creates a dish that’s perfect for a festive meal or a simple, flavorful dinner.

Dominica Food – Reef Chicken Ingredients

Chicken Marinade:

  • 2 pounds of chicken thighs or breasts, cut into pieces
  • 1/2 cup dark rum
  • 2 tablespoons lime juice
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1 teaspoon black pepper
  • 1 teaspoon paprika
  • 1 teaspoon thyme
  • 1 teaspoon garlic powder
  • 1 teaspoon onion powder

Cooking the Chicken:

  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1 large onion, chopped
  • 3 garlic cloves, minced
  • 1 bell pepper, chopped
  • 2 tomatoes, chopped
  • 1 cup chicken broth
  • 1 teaspoon allspice
  • 1/2 teaspoon cayenne pepper (optional for heat)
  • 1 cup pineapple chunks
  • 2 tablespoons fresh parsley, chopped

Dominica Food – Reef Chicken Cooking Instructions

Marinating the Chicken:

  1. Prepare the Marinade:
    • In a large bowl, mix the dark rum, lime juice, olive oil, salt, black pepper, paprika, thyme, garlic powder, and onion powder.
  2. Marinate the Chicken:
    • Add the chicken pieces to the bowl and coat them well with the marinade.
    • Cover the bowl and refrigerate for at least 1 hour, or overnight for the best flavor.

Cooking the Chicken:

  1. Sautéing the Vegetables:
    • In a large pot, heat 2 tablespoons of olive oil over medium heat.
    • Add the chopped onion and garlic, and sauté until they are soft and fragrant.
    • Add the bell pepper and tomatoes, and cook for another 5 minutes.
  2. Cooking the Chicken:
    • Add the marinated chicken pieces to the pot.
    • Cook until the chicken is browned on all sides.
  3. Creating the Sauce:
    • Pour in the chicken broth.
    • Add the allspice and cayenne pepper (if using).
    • Stir well to combine all the ingredients.
  4. Adding Pineapple and Simmering:
    • Add the pineapple chunks to the pot.
    • Bring the mixture to a boil, then reduce the heat to low.
    • Cover the pot and let it simmer for 30 minutes, or until the chicken is cooked through.
  5. Finishing Touches:
    • Stir in the fresh parsley.
    • Taste the dish and adjust the seasoning if needed.

Dive into the flavors of Dominica with this delightful Reef Chicken and bring a taste of the Caribbean to your table!


Dominica Food – Conconete (Masitas – Coconut Cookies) 

Dominica Food - Conconete (Masitas - Coconut Cookies)
Conconete (Masitas – Coconut Cookies)

History and Background

Conconete, also known as Masitas, are delicious coconut cookies from the beautiful island of Dominica in the Caribbean. Dominica is known for its stunning beaches, vibrant culture, and delicious cuisine, which combines African, French, and indigenous influences.

These cookies are a popular treat on the island, often enjoyed during festivals and special occasions. Made with freshly grated coconut, these sweet treats offer a taste of the tropics in every bite.

Dominica Food – Conconete Ingredients

Cookies:

  • 2 cups grated coconut (fresh or unsweetened dried)
  • 1 cup all-purpose flour
  • 1/2 cup sugar
  • 1/2 teaspoon baking powder
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground nutmeg
  • 1/4 cup butter, melted
  • 1/2 cup coconut milk
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract

Dominica Food – Conconete Cooking Instructions

Preparing the Dough:

  1. Mix the Dry Ingredients:
    • In a large bowl, combine the grated coconut, all-purpose flour, sugar, baking powder, salt, ground cinnamon, and ground nutmeg.
  2. Add the Wet Ingredients:
    • Pour in the melted butter, coconut milk, and vanilla extract.
    • Mix until all the ingredients are well combined and form a dough.

Shaping and Baking the Cookies:

  1. Preheat the Oven:
    • Preheat your oven to 350°F (175°C).
  2. Shape the Cookies:
    • Scoop small portions of dough and roll them into balls.
    • Place the dough balls on a baking sheet lined with parchment paper.
    • Flatten each ball slightly with the back of a spoon.
  3. Bake the Cookies:
    • Bake the cookies in the preheated oven for 15-20 minutes, or until they are golden brown around the edges.
  4. Cool the Cookies:
    • Remove the cookies from the oven and let them cool on a wire rack.

Enjoy the sweet and tropical flavors of Dominica with these delightful Conconete coconut cookies! They are perfect for sharing with family and friends, bringing a little piece of the Caribbean into your home.


Dominica Food – Callaloo Soup 

Dominica Food - Callaloo Soup 
Callaloo Soup 

History and Background

Callaloo Soup is a traditional dish from the vibrant island of Dominica in the Caribbean. Dominica is known for its lush rainforests, stunning waterfalls, and rich cultural heritage. This soup is made from callaloo leaves, which are similar to spinach and packed with nutrients.

The dish reflects the island’s blend of African, French, and indigenous influences, offering a delicious and healthy meal that’s enjoyed by locals and visitors alike. Callaloo Soup is perfect for a hearty lunch or a light dinner, bringing a taste of Dominica’s natural bounty to your table.

Dominica Food – Callaloo Soup Ingredients

For the Soup:

  • 1 pound callaloo leaves (or spinach), washed and chopped
  • 1 medium onion, chopped
  • 3 garlic cloves, minced
  • 1 bell pepper, chopped
  • 2 tomatoes, chopped
  • 1 cup coconut milk
  • 4 cups chicken broth
  • 1 teaspoon thyme
  • 1 teaspoon black pepper
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 1/2 pound smoked meat (optional), cut into pieces

Dominica Food – Callaloo Soup Cooking Instructions

Preparing the Vegetables:

  1. Chop the Vegetables:
    • Wash and chop the callaloo leaves (or spinach).
    • Chop the onion, bell pepper, and tomatoes.
    • Mince the garlic cloves.

Cooking the Soup:

  1. Sautéing the Vegetables:
    • In a large pot, heat 1 tablespoon of olive oil over medium heat.
    • Add the chopped onion and minced garlic, and sauté until they are soft and fragrant.
    • Add the chopped bell pepper and tomatoes, and cook for another 5 minutes.
  2. Adding the Callaloo:
    • Add the chopped callaloo leaves to the pot.
    • Stir well and cook until the leaves wilt.
  3. Creating the Soup Base:
    • Pour in the coconut milk and chicken broth.
    • Add the thyme, black pepper, and salt.
    • If using smoked meat, add it to the pot.
  4. Simmering the Soup:
    • Bring the soup to a boil, then reduce the heat to low.
    • Cover the pot and let it simmer for 30 minutes, or until all the flavors are well combined and the callaloo is tender.
  5. Final Touches:
    • Taste the soup and adjust the seasoning if needed.

Enjoy the rich and nourishing flavors of Dominica with this traditional Callaloo Soup and bring a bit of the Caribbean’s warmth and hospitality into your kitchen!


Dominica Food – Goat Water 

Dominica Food - Goat Water 
Goat Water 

History and Background

Goat Water is a hearty and flavorful stew that comes from the beautiful island of Dominica in the Caribbean. Dominica, known for its lush rainforests, mountains, and vibrant culture, blends African, French, and indigenous influences in its cuisine.

Goat Water, also known as goat stew, is a beloved dish on the island, often prepared for special occasions and gatherings. The stew is made with tender goat meat, spices, and vegetables, creating a rich and savory meal that captures the essence of Dominica’s culinary traditions.

Dominica Food – Goat Water Ingredients

For the Stew:

  • 2 pounds goat meat, cut into pieces
  • 2 tablespoons lime juice
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1 large onion, chopped
  • 3 garlic cloves, minced
  • 2 bell peppers, chopped
  • 2 tomatoes, chopped
  • 2 potatoes, diced
  • 2 carrots, sliced
  • 1 cup pumpkin, diced
  • 1 cup coconut milk
  • 4 cups water or beef broth
  • 1 teaspoon thyme
  • 1 teaspoon black pepper
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1 tablespoon Worcestershire sauce
  • 1 tablespoon tomato paste
  • 1 scotch bonnet pepper (optional for heat)
  • 2 tablespoons fresh parsley, chopped

Dominica Food – Goat Water Cooking Instructions

Marinating the Goat Meat:

  1. Prepare the Marinade:
    • In a large bowl, mix the goat meat with lime juice, salt, and black pepper.
    • Let it marinate for at least 30 minutes to enhance the flavor.

Preparing the Stew:

  1. Sautéing the Vegetables:
    • In a large pot, heat 2 tablespoons of olive oil over medium heat.
    • Add the chopped onion and minced garlic, and sauté until they are soft and fragrant.
    • Add the chopped bell peppers and tomatoes, and cook for another 5 minutes.
  2. Browning the Meat:
    • Add the marinated goat meat to the pot.
    • Cook until the meat is browned on all sides.
  3. Creating the Stew Base:
    • Add the thyme, Worcestershire sauce, and tomato paste to the pot.
    • Stir well to combine all the ingredients.
  4. Simmering the Stew:
    • Pour in the coconut milk and water or beef broth.
    • Add the diced potatoes, sliced carrots, and diced pumpkin.
    • If using, add the scotch bonnet pepper for heat.
    • Bring the stew to a boil, then reduce the heat to low.
    • Cover the pot and let it simmer for 1.5 to 2 hours, or until the goat meat is tender and the vegetables are cooked through.
  5. Final Touches:
    • Stir in the fresh parsley.
    • Taste the stew and adjust the seasoning if needed.

Dive into the rich and savory flavors of Dominica with this traditional Goat Water, a stew that brings the heart of the Caribbean into your kitchen!


Dominica Food – Sancoche (Thick, Creamy Soup) 

Dominica Food - Sancoche (Thick, Creamy Soup) 
Sancoche (Thick, Creamy Soup) 

History and Background

Sancoche is a thick and creamy soup from the beautiful island of Dominica in the Caribbean. Dominica is known for its lush green landscapes, vibrant culture, and rich culinary traditions. Sancoche, a hearty and filling soup, is a staple in Dominican households.

The dish is a delicious blend of root vegetables, meats, and coconut milk, reflecting the island’s diverse cultural influences, including African, French, and indigenous heritage. This soup is perfect for a comforting meal that brings the warmth and flavor of Dominica right to your table.

Dominica Food – Sancoche Ingredients

For the Soup:

  • 1 pound saltfish (codfish) or any other firm white fish
  • 1 large onion, chopped
  • 3 garlic cloves, minced
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1 bell pepper, chopped
  • 2 tomatoes, chopped
  • 2 potatoes, diced
  • 2 carrots, sliced
  • 1 cup pumpkin, diced
  • 1 cup yams, diced
  • 1 cup coconut milk
  • 4 cups water or chicken broth
  • 1 teaspoon thyme
  • 1 teaspoon black pepper
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1 tablespoon parsley, chopped
  • 1 scotch bonnet pepper (optional for heat)

Dominica Food – Sancoche Cooking Instructions

Preparing the Fish:

  1. Soaking the Saltfish:
    • If using saltfish, soak it in water for a few hours or overnight to remove excess salt.
    • Rinse and drain the fish, then cut it into pieces.

Preparing the Soup:

  1. Sautéing the Vegetables:
    • In a large pot, heat 2 tablespoons of olive oil over medium heat.
    • Add the chopped onion and minced garlic, and sauté until they are soft and fragrant.
    • Add the chopped bell pepper and tomatoes, and cook for another 5 minutes.
  2. Adding the Fish:
    • Add the pieces of fish to the pot and cook until slightly browned.
  3. Creating the Soup Base:
    • Pour in the coconut milk and water or chicken broth.
    • Add the thyme, black pepper, and salt.
    • Stir well to combine all the ingredients.
  4. Simmering the Soup:
    • Add the diced potatoes, sliced carrots, diced pumpkin, and yams to the pot.
    • If using, add the scotch bonnet pepper for heat.
    • Bring the soup to a boil, then reduce the heat to low.
    • Cover the pot and let it simmer for 45 minutes to 1 hour, or until all the vegetables are tender.
  5. Final Touches:
    • Stir in the fresh parsley.
    • Taste the soup and adjust the seasoning if needed.

Enjoy the rich and creamy flavors of Dominica with this traditional Sancoche soup, a dish that brings the heart and soul of the Caribbean into your home!


Dominica Food – Pepperpot 

Dominica Food - Pepperpot 
Pepperpot 

History and Background

Pepperpot is a traditional and flavorful stew that hails from the lush island of Dominica in the Caribbean. Known for its rich cultural heritage and stunning landscapes, Dominica’s cuisine is a blend of African, French, and indigenous influences.

Pepperpot is a beloved dish on the island, often served during festive occasions and family gatherings. This hearty stew is made with a variety of meats, vegetables, and spices, creating a rich and savory meal that warms the soul.

It’s a perfect dish to bring a taste of Dominica to your dinner table.

Dominica Food – Pepperpot Ingredients

For the Stew:

  • 1 pound beef, cut into cubes
  • 1 pound pork, cut into cubes
  • 1 pound chicken, cut into pieces
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1 large onion, chopped
  • 3 garlic cloves, minced
  • 2 bell peppers, chopped
  • 2 tomatoes, chopped
  • 2 potatoes, diced
  • 2 carrots, sliced
  • 1 cup green beans, chopped
  • 1 cup spinach, chopped
  • 4 cups beef broth
  • 1 cup coconut milk
  • 1 teaspoon thyme
  • 1 teaspoon black pepper
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 2 tablespoons Worcestershire sauce
  • 1 tablespoon tomato paste
  • 1 scotch bonnet pepper (optional for heat)
  • 2 tablespoons fresh parsley, chopped

Dominica Food – Pepperpot Cooking Instructions

Preparing the Meats:

  1. Season the Meats:
    • Season the beef, pork, and chicken pieces with salt and black pepper.

Cooking the Stew:

  1. Sautéing the Vegetables:
    • In a large pot, heat 2 tablespoons of olive oil over medium heat.
    • Add the chopped onion and minced garlic, and sauté until they are soft and fragrant.
    • Add the chopped bell peppers and tomatoes, and cook for another 5 minutes.
  2. Browning the Meats:
    • Add the seasoned beef, pork, and chicken to the pot.
    • Cook until the meats are browned on all sides.
  3. Creating the Stew Base:
    • Add the thyme, Worcestershire sauce, and tomato paste to the pot.
    • Stir well to combine all the ingredients.
  4. Simmering the Stew:
    • Pour in the beef broth and coconut milk.
    • Add the diced potatoes, sliced carrots, green beans, and spinach.
    • If using, add the scotch bonnet pepper for heat.
    • Bring the stew to a boil, then reduce the heat to low.
    • Cover the pot and let it simmer for 1.5 to 2 hours, or until the meats are tender and the vegetables are cooked through.
  5. Final Touches:
    • Stir in the fresh parsley.
    • Taste the stew and adjust the seasoning if needed.

Enjoy the rich and hearty flavors of Dominica with this traditional Pepperpot, a stew that brings the heart of the Caribbean into your kitchen!


Dominica Food – Accras (Fish Fritters) 

Dominica Food - Accras (Fish Fritters) 
Accras (Fish Fritters) 

History and Background

Accras, also known as fish fritters, are a popular snack from the beautiful island of Dominica in the Caribbean. Dominica is famous for its breathtaking natural beauty, vibrant culture, and delicious cuisine, which blends African, French, and indigenous influences.

Accras are made with salted codfish, spices, and herbs, creating a savory and crispy treat that’s perfect for any occasion. These fritters are often enjoyed as an appetizer or snack, especially during festivals and family gatherings, bringing a taste of Dominica’s rich culinary traditions to your table.

Dominica Food – Accras Ingredients

For the Fritters:

  • 1 pound saltfish (codfish)
  • 1 cup all-purpose flour
  • 1 teaspoon baking powder
  • 1 large egg
  • 1/2 cup water
  • 1 small onion, finely chopped
  • 2 garlic cloves, minced
  • 1 small bell pepper, finely chopped
  • 2 green onions, finely chopped
  • 1 tablespoon fresh parsley, chopped
  • 1 teaspoon thyme
  • 1/2 teaspoon black pepper
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt (if needed)
  • 1 scotch bonnet pepper, finely chopped (optional for heat)
  • Vegetable oil (for frying)

Dominica Food – Accras Cooking Instructions

Preparing the Fish:

  1. Soak the Saltfish:
    • Soak the saltfish in water for a few hours or overnight to remove excess salt.
    • Rinse and drain the fish, then flake it into small pieces.

Making the Batter:

  1. Mix the Dry Ingredients:
    • In a large bowl, combine the all-purpose flour, baking powder, black pepper, and salt (if needed).
  2. Add the Wet Ingredients:
    • Beat the egg and add it to the bowl along with the water.
    • Mix until you have a smooth batter.
  3. Combine Everything:
    • Add the flaked saltfish, chopped onion, minced garlic, bell pepper, green onions, parsley, thyme, and scotch bonnet pepper (if using) to the batter.
    • Stir well to combine all the ingredients.

Frying the Fritters:

  1. Heat the Oil:
    • In a large skillet, heat about 1 inch of vegetable oil over medium-high heat until hot.
  2. Fry the Fritters:
    • Drop spoonfuls of the batter into the hot oil, being careful not to overcrowd the skillet.
    • Fry the fritters until they are golden brown and crispy on all sides, about 3-4 minutes per side.
  3. Drain the Fritters:
    • Use a slotted spoon to transfer the fritters to a paper towel-lined plate to drain any excess oil.

Enjoy the crispy and savory flavors of Dominica with these traditional Accras, a delightful snack that brings the essence of the Caribbean to your kitchen!


Dominica Food – Cassava Bread 

Dominica Food - Cassava Bread 

History and Background

The Bread is a traditional food from Dominica, a beautiful island in the Caribbean known for its lush rainforests and vibrant culture. Dominica’s cuisine is a blend of African, French, and indigenous influences.

It is made from grated cassava root, is a staple that dates back to the indigenous Kalinago people. It’s a gluten-free flatbread that is both crispy and chewy, often enjoyed with stews, soups, or as a snack on its own.

Making it is a simple yet rewarding process that brings a taste of Dominica’s rich history and flavors to your table.

Dominica Food – Ingredients

For the Bread:

  • 2 pounds cassava root
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 cup grated coconut (optional for added flavor)

Dominica Food – Cooking Instructions

Preparing the Cassava:

  1. Peel and Grate the Cassava:
    • Peel the cassava root carefully.
    • Grate the peeled cassava using a fine grater or food processor.
  2. Remove Excess Liquid:
    • Place the grated cassava in a clean cloth or cheesecloth.
    • Squeeze out as much liquid as possible to ensure the cassava is dry.

Making the Bread:

  1. Mix the Ingredients:
    • In a large bowl, combine the grated cassava with salt and grated coconut if using.
    • Mix well to ensure an even distribution of ingredients.
  2. Shape the Bread:
    • Take a handful of the cassava mixture and form it into a ball.
    • Flatten the ball into a thin, round disc about 1/4 inch thick.
  3. Cook the Bread:
    • Heat a large non-stick skillet or griddle over medium heat.
    • Place the cassava discs on the hot skillet.
    • Cook for about 5-7 minutes on each side, or until the bread is golden brown and crispy.

Enjoy the authentic taste of Dominica with this traditional Dish, a simple yet delicious dish that brings the island’s culinary heritage to your kitchen!


Dominica Food – Bakes and Saltfish 

Dominica Food - Bakes and Saltfish 
Bakes and Saltfish 

History and Background

Bakes and Saltfish are a classic dish from Dominica, a picturesque island nestled in the Caribbean Sea. Dominica is renowned for its lush rainforests, pristine beaches, and vibrant culture. This dish reflects the island’s rich culinary heritage, blending African, French, and indigenous influences.

Bakes, also known as fried dumplings, are made from a simple dough of flour, water, and baking powder, while saltfish refers to salted codfish. Bakes and Saltfish are a popular breakfast dish in Dominica and are enjoyed by locals and visitors alike for their delicious flavors and hearty nature.

Dominica Food – Bakes and Saltfish Ingredients

For the Bakes:

  • 2 cups all-purpose flour
  • 2 teaspoons baking powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1 tablespoon sugar
  • 2 tablespoons butter, melted
  • 3/4 cup water (or as needed)
  • Vegetable oil (for frying)

For the Saltfish:

  • 1 pound saltfish (codfish)
  • 1 onion, sliced
  • 2 tomatoes, chopped
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1 bell pepper, sliced
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1/2 teaspoon black pepper
  • 1/2 teaspoon thyme
  • 1 scotch bonnet pepper (optional for heat)
  • 2 tablespoons fresh parsley, chopped
  • Lime wedges (for serving)

Dominica Food – Bakes and Saltfish Cooking Instructions

Preparing the Bakes:

  1. Mixing the Dough:
    • In a large bowl, combine the all-purpose flour, baking powder, salt, and sugar.
    • Add the melted butter and mix well.
    • Gradually add water and knead until a soft dough forms.
  2. Shaping the Bakes:
    • Divide the dough into small balls and flatten them into discs about 1/4 inch thick.
  3. Frying the Bakes:
    • Heat vegetable oil in a frying pan over medium heat.
    • Fry the bakes until golden brown on both sides, about 3-4 minutes per side.
    • Drain on paper towels to remove excess oil.

Preparing the Saltfish:

  1. Soaking the Saltfish:
    • Soak the saltfish in water for a few hours or overnight to remove excess salt.
    • Rinse and drain the fish, then flake it into small pieces.
  2. Cooking the Saltfish:
    • In a large skillet, heat olive oil over medium heat.
    • Add the sliced onions, minced garlic, and bell pepper.
    • Cook until the vegetables are softened, about 5 minutes.
  3. Adding the Saltfish:
    • Add the flaked saltfish to the skillet.
    • Season with black pepper, thyme, and chopped parsley.
    • If using, add the scotch bonnet pepper for heat.
    • Cook for an additional 5-7 minutes, stirring occasionally, until the saltfish is heated through.

Indulge in the flavors of Dominica with this delightful combination of Bakes and Saltfish, perfect for a hearty breakfast or brunch that will transport you to the sunny shores of the Caribbean!


Dominica Food – Pelau 

Dominica Food - Pelau 
Pelau 

History and Background

Dominica, nestled in the Caribbean Sea, is renowned for its vibrant culture and tantalizing cuisine. Pelau, a one-pot dish packed with flavors, represents the island’s diverse culinary heritage.

Originating from West Africa, it traveled with enslaved Africans to the Caribbean, where it evolved into a beloved dish. Dominica’s version features rice, pigeon peas, and meat, reflecting the island’s fusion of African, Indigenous, and European influences.

Pelau is a staple at gatherings, embodying the spirit of community and celebration.

Dominica Food – Pelau Ingredients

For the Pelau:

  • 2 cups rice
  • 1 cup pigeon peas
  • 1 pound chicken, cut into pieces
  • 1 onion, chopped
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1 bell pepper, diced
  • 1 carrot, diced
  • 2 tomatoes, chopped
  • 2 tablespoons soy sauce
  • 2 tablespoons Worcestershire sauce
  • 2 tablespoons brown sugar
  • 2 cups coconut milk
  • 3 cups chicken broth
  • 2 tablespoons vegetable oil
  • Salt and black pepper to taste

Dominica Food – Pelau Cooking Instructions

Preparing the Ingredients:

  1. Marinate the Chicken:
    • In a bowl, combine chicken pieces with soy sauce, Worcestershire sauce, and brown sugar. Let it marinate for at least 30 minutes.
  2. Soak the Pigeon Peas:
    • If using dried pigeon peas, soak them in water overnight or for at least 6 hours. Drain before using.

Cooking the Pelau:

  1. Sautéing the Aromatics:
    • In a large pot, heat vegetable oil over medium heat.
    • Add chopped onion, minced garlic, diced bell pepper, and diced carrot. Sauté until softened.
  2. Adding the Chicken:
    • Add marinated chicken pieces to the pot. Cook until browned on all sides.
  3. Incorporating the Rice and Peas:
    • Stir in rice and drained pigeon peas. Cook for a few minutes to toast the rice.
  4. Seasoning the Pelau:
    • Add chopped tomatoes, coconut milk, and chicken broth to the pot.
    • Season with salt and black pepper according to taste.
  5. Simmering the Pelau:
    • Bring the mixture to a boil, then reduce heat to low.
    • Cover and simmer for about 25-30 minutes, or until rice is cooked and liquid is absorbed.
  6. Final Touches:
    • Once cooked, fluff the pelau with a fork.
    • Serve hot and enjoy!

Indulge in the heartwarming flavors of Dominica with this soulful Pelau recipe, perfect for bringing the taste of the Caribbean into your home!


Dominica Food – Titiri (River Fish Fritters) 

Dominica Food - Titiri (River Fish Fritters) 
Titiri (River Fish Fritters) 

Dominica Titiwi Accra: A Flavorful Caribbean Delight

History and Background

Titiwi, scientifically known as salangidae, is a tiny translucent fish typically found near the river’s mouth in Dominica. These little fish, measuring between 2 to 5 inches, belong to the trout and salmon family. Titiwi follows the lunar calendar, appearing near the shore at specific times of the year. In Dominica, this unassuming fish has earned a special place in the culinary landscape, particularly in the beloved dish known as “accra.”

Accra, often referred to as fritters in the Caribbean, is a signature dish in Dominica. While saltfish (codfish) is the most popular ingredient for accra, titiwi has its own unique charm due to its limited availability.

Some villages, like Layou, even celebrate titiwi with festivals dedicated to this tiny fish.

Dominica Food – Titiri Ingredients

  • 2½ cups titiwi (silver fish)
  • 2 cups all-purpose flour
  • 2½ cups water
  • ¼ cup chopped onion
  • ¼ cup chopped parsley
  • ¼ cup chopped green onions
  • ¼ cup thyme leaves
  • 2 tbsp chopped hot peppers (adjust to taste)
  • 1 tbsp turmeric
  • 1 tsp black pepper
  • Salt (to taste)
  • 1 tbsp garlic powder
  • 1 tbsp baking powder
  • 2 tbsp lime or lemon juice
  • 3 cups oil (for frying)

Dominica Food – Titiri Recipe

1. Prepare the Titiwi Batter

  1. Rinse the titiwi in lemon or lime juice and water, then drain.
  2. In a bowl, mix the flour and water.
  3. Add the chopped onion, parsley, green onions, thyme leaves, hot peppers, turmeric, black pepper, salt, and garlic powder to the flour mixture.
  4. Mix well.
  5. Add the titiwi to the mixture to create your titiwi batter.
  6. Finally, add the baking powder and continue mixing.

2. Fry the Titiwi Accra

  1. Heat the oil in a saucepan or use a deep fryer.
  2. Use an ice cream scoop or measuring cup (about ¼ cup) to drop portions of the batter into the hot oil.
  3. Fry the accra until golden brown and crispy, turning them over as needed.
  4. Remove the accra from the oil using tongs.
  5. Place them on paper towels to drain excess oil.

Enjoy your culinary adventure with this delightful Dominica titiwi accra


Dominica Food – Crab Backs 

Dominica Food - Crab Backs 
Crab Backs 

Crab Backs: A Taste of Dominica’s Coastal Bounty

History and Background

Crab backs, a beloved dish in Dominica, celebrate the island’s coastal abundance. In this Caribbean gem, crabs are collected during the creole season, often at night. Locals venture into swampy areas, armed with flashlights or even just their feet, to catch these elusive crustaceans. The tradition of crab hunting has deep roots, connecting Dominicans to their natural surroundings and culinary heritage.

Dominica Food – Crab Backs Ingredients

  • 6 land crabs (use local crabs for authenticity)
  • 2 cups soaked bread
  • ¼ cup oil
  • 1 large onion (finely diced)
  • 2 cloves garlic (crushed)
  • 6 seasoning peppers (finely diced)
  • 1 hot pepper (chopped, adjust to taste)
  • ¼ cup fresh parsley (chopped)
  • ¼ cup fresh celery (chopped)
  • 1 small bouillon cube (crushed)
  • Seasoned breadcrumbs

Dominica Food – Crab Backs Recipe

1. Prepare the Crab Backs

  1. Wash and scald the crabs in salt water.
  2. Set aside the clean crab backs.
  3. Pick the flesh off the crab and set it aside.
  4. Heat oil in a skillet and sauté the onion, garlic, and seasonings for 5 minutes.
  5. Add the crab meat and bouillon cube. Cook for another 15 minutes, stirring until the mixture holds together.
  6. Remove the mixture from heat.

2. Fill and Bake

  1. Fill the crab shells with the crab mixture.
  2. Sprinkle seasoned breadcrumbs over the top.
  3. Bake in a hot oven for 5-10 minutes until golden brown.

Serve these delightful crab backs as an appetizer or alongside your Creole-style lunch. The aroma, flavors, and textures will transport you to the heart of Dominica’s culinary heritage.

Serves: 3-6 people Cooking Time: Approximately 30 minutes Calories: Nutritional information varies based on portion size and ingredients used. Enjoy the taste of Dominica!


Dominica Food – Codfish Buljol 

Dominica Food - Codfish Buljol 
Codfish Buljol 

Codfish Buljol: A Caribbean Breakfast Tradition

History and Background

Codfish buljol, a beloved dish in Trinidad and Tobago, reflects the island’s rich culinary heritage. The name “buljol” is derived from the French words “brûle gueule,” which mean “burn mouth.” Traditionally served at room temperature, this salad of shredded salted codfish packs a flavorful punch thanks to the addition of fiery hot peppers.

In Trinidad, buljol is a staple for breakfast or Sunday brunch. Its simplicity lies in the combination of salted cod, fresh vegetables, and zesty seasonings. The dish embodies the island’s vibrant culture and the fusion of African, Indian, and European influences.

Dominica Food – Codfish Buljol Ingredients

  • 1/2 lb salted cod (saltfish)
  • 1 or 2 large tomatoes, finely chopped
  • 1/2 tsp fresh hot pepper, chopped (adjust to taste)
  • 1 onion, finely chopped or sliced
  • 1 sweet pepper, finely chopped (optional)
  • 1 – 2 tbsp olive oil

Dominica Food – Codfish Buljol Recipe

1. Prepare the Salted Cod

  1. Break the salted cod into pieces and place them in a saucepan with cold water.
  2. Gradually heat the water to boiling and discard it.
  3. Repeat this process until the fish tastes fresh and is no longer overly salty.
  4. Remove the skin and bones from the cod and break the pieces into smaller chunks.

2. Create the Buljol

  1. In a bowl, combine the shredded cod with the chopped tomatoes, hot pepper, onion, and sweet pepper (if using).
  2. Drizzle olive oil over the mixture and toss to combine.
  3. Let the flavors meld for a few minutes.

Serving and Enjoyment

Serve your codfish buljol with warm buttered toast, coconut bake, or bread. It’s a delightful way to start your day, and the tangy, spicy flavors will awaken your taste buds.

Enjoy this Trinidadian classic!


Dominica Food – Fried Plantains 

Dominica Food - Fried Plantains 
Fried Plantains 

Tostones (Fried Green Plantains): A Taste of the Caribbean

History and Background

Tostones, also known as fritos verdes (fried green plantains), are a beloved side dish in the Dominican Republic. These crispy, golden brown chips are made from unripe green plantains and are a staple in many Latin American countries. The versatility of plantains is remarkable, and Dominicans hold them in high regard as a symbol of patriotism, especially among those living abroad.

Dominica Food – Fried Plantains Ingredients

  • 2 large green plantains
  • Vegetable oil (for frying)
  • Salt (to taste)

Dominica Food – Fried Plantains Recipe

1. Prepare the Plantains

  1. Peel the plantains by making a shallow cut along the length of the skin and then gently removing it.
  2. Cut the plantains into 1-inch thick rounds.

2. Fry the Plantains

  1. Heat vegetable oil in a deep skillet or frying pan.
  2. Fry the plantain rounds for about 3-4 minutes on each side until they turn golden brown.
  3. Remove the fried plantains and place them on a plate lined with paper towels.

3. Flatten and Refry

  1. Using the bottom of a bottle, small pan, or a tostonera (if available), press down on the fried plantains to flatten them to about half their original size.
  2. Return the flattened plantains to the hot oil and fry for an additional 2 minutes on each side until crisp around the edges.
  3. Remove from the oil, place on a plate, and sprinkle with salt.

Serving and Enjoyment

Tostones are best enjoyed hot and crispy. Serve them as a side dish with meats, eggs, cheese, seafood, or any other favorite meal. They’re a delightful taste of the Caribbean!


Dominica Food – Harina de Maíz (Porridge Made from Cornmeal)

Dominica Food - Porridge Made from Cornmeal
Porridge Made from Cornmeal

Harina de Maíz: A Creamy Dominican Cornmeal Delight

History and Background

Harina de maíz, also known as Dominican cornmeal porridge, is a comforting dish that warms both hearts and bellies. In the Dominican Republic, this humble yet delightful porridge graces breakfast tables, bringing families together over steaming bowls. Its roots trace back to the indigenous Taino people who cultivated corn, and it has evolved into a beloved staple across the island.

Dominica Food – Harina de Maíz Ingredients

  • 1 cup cornmeal (harina de maíz)
  • 3 cups whole milk
  • 1/4 cup white sugar
  • 1/2 tsp ground cinnamon
  • 1/4 tsp ground nutmeg
  • 1/4 tsp salt
  • 1/2 tsp vanilla extract (optional)
  • 1/2 cup coconut milk (optional, for a tropical twist)

Dominica Food – Harina de Maíz Recipe

1. Prepare the Cornmeal Base

  1. In a medium saucepan, combine the cornmeal and 1 cup of milk. Whisk until smooth.
  2. Gradually add the remaining milk, stirring constantly to prevent lumps.
  3. Add the sugar, cinnamon, nutmeg, and salt. Mix well.
  4. If using, add the vanilla extract for extra flavor.

2. Cook the Porridge

  1. Place the saucepan over medium heat.
  2. Stir the mixture continuously as it thickens. Be patient; it will take about 8 minutes.
  3. Once the porridge reaches a creamy consistency, remove it from the heat.

Serving and Enjoyment

Serve harina de maíz warm in bowls, sprinkled with a pinch of cinnamon. The coconut milk adds a tropical twist, making it even more delightful. Share this comforting breakfast with loved ones—it’s a taste of Dominican tradition!

Buen provecho!


Dominica Food – Coconut Turnovers 

Dominica Food - Coconut Turnovers 
Coconut Turnovers 

Coconut Turnovers: A Taste of Dominica

History and Background

Allow me to whisk you away to the sun-kissed shores of Dominica, a Caribbean gem where lush rainforests meet pristine beaches. Nestled in this tropical paradise, the humble Coconut Turnover beckons with its irresistible aroma and delightful flavors.

Picture yourself strolling through bustling markets, the air thick with the scent of spices and coconut. The origins of this beloved pastry trace back to the island’s rich culinary heritage—a fusion of African, European, and indigenous influences.

As the trade winds carried ingredients across oceans, Dominica embraced them all, weaving them into its vibrant food tapestry. The Coconut Turnover, with its flaky crust and sweet coconut filling, embodies this harmonious blend.

Dominica Food – Coconut Turnovers Ingredients

  • Dough:
    • 1 cup milk
    • 1 tablespoon sugar
    • 1 tablespoon active dry yeast
    • 3 tablespoons melted butter
    • 1 large egg
    • 3 cups all-purpose flour
  • Filling:
    • 2 cups shredded coconut

Dominica Food – Coconut Turnovers Recipe

1. Prepare the Dough

  1. Warm the milk slightly and dissolve the sugar in it.
  2. Sprinkle the yeast over the milk mixture and let it activate for about 10 minutes.
  3. In a large bowl, combine the melted butter, egg, and activated yeast mixture.
  4. Gradually add the flour and knead until you have a smooth, elastic dough.
  5. Cover the dough and let it rise in a warm place for 1 hour.

2. Shape the Turnovers

  1. Preheat your oven to 350°F (180°C).
  2. Roll out the dough on a floured surface to about ¼-inch thickness.
  3. Cut circles (about 6 inches in diameter) from the dough.
  4. Place a generous spoonful of shredded coconut in the center of each circle.
  5. Fold the dough over the filling to create a half-moon shape.
  6. Seal the edges by pressing them together with a fork.

3. Bake to Golden Perfection

  1. Arrange the turnovers on a baking sheet lined with parchment paper.
  2. Brush the tops with a little milk or beaten egg for a golden finish.
  3. Bake for 20-25 minutes or until they’re beautifully browned.

4. Serve and Savor

  1. Let the Coconut Turnovers cool slightly.
  2. Dust them with powdered sugar if desired.
  3. Enjoy the flaky layers and the sweet coconut filling.

Indulge in a taste of Dominica—the Coconut Turnover is a little slice of paradise you can savor anywhere!


Dominica Food – Cassava Pone (A Dense Cake Made from Grated Cassava) 

Dominica Food - Cassava Pone (A Dense Cake Made from Grated Cassava) 
Pone (A Dense Cake Made from Grated Cassava) 

A Taste of Dominica

History and Background

Allow me to whisk you away to the sun-kissed shores of Dominica, a Caribbean gem where lush rainforests meet pristine beaches. Nestled in this tropical paradise, the humble meal beckons with its irresistible aroma and delightful flavors.

Picture yourself strolling through bustling markets, the air thick with the scent of spices and coconut. The origins of this beloved pastry trace back to the island’s rich culinary heritage—a fusion of African, European, and indigenous influences.

As the trade winds carried ingredients across oceans, Dominica embraced them all, weaving them into its vibrant food tapestry. The flaky crust and sweet coconut filling, embodies this harmonious blend.

Dominica Food – Ingredients

  • Dough:
    • 4 cups grated sweet cassava
    • 1 cup grated coconut
    • 1 cup grated pumpkin
    • 1 cup brown sugar
    • 1 teaspoon ground spice
    • ½ teaspoon nutmeg
    • 2 tablespoons melted butter or golden ray margarine
    • 2 cups coconut milk
    • 1 teaspoon baking powder
    • 1 teaspoon vanilla essence
    • 1 teaspoon ground cloves
    • ½ cup seedless raisins

Dominica Food – Pone Recipe

1. Prepare the Dough

  1. Grate the cassava, coconut, and pumpkin.
  2. Mix together the cassava, coconut, pumpkin, sugar, ground spice, and nutmeg.
  3. Cut in the melted butter until well combined.
  4. Stir in the coconut milk.
  5. Add baking powder, vanilla essence, ground cloves, and raisins.
  6. Pour the mixture into a well-greased 9″ x 9″ (23cm x 23cm) loaf pan.

2. Bake to Golden Perfection

  1. Preheat your oven to 350°F (180°C).
  2. Bake for 1 hour or until crisp and brown.
  3. Cool and cut into bars.

Indulge in a taste of Dominica—the dish is a little slice of paradise you can savor anywhere! 🌴🥥🥐


Dominica Food – Coconut Water 

Dominica Food - Coconut Water 
Coconut Water 

Coconut Water: A Refreshing Tropical Quencher

History and Background

Welcome to the sun-drenched shores of Dominica, the “nature island” of the Caribbean. Here, where lush rainforests meet pristine beaches, the coconut palm reigns supreme. Coconut water, the clear liquid found inside young green coconuts, is a cherished beverage that quenches thirst and nourishes the soul.

Locals have been sipping this natural elixir for generations, finding solace in its hydrating properties and delicate flavor. As the trade winds sweep across the island, they whisper tales of coconut groves swaying in harmony—a testament to the island’s bounty.

Dominica Food – Coconut Water Ingredients

  • Fresh coconut water (from young green coconuts)

Dominica Food – Coconut Water Recipe

1. Harvest the Coconuts

  1. Seek out a young green coconut, plucked straight from the palm.
  2. The coconut should feel heavy and full, indicating an abundance of refreshing water inside.

2. Crack It Open

  1. With a sturdy knife or machete, carefully slice off the top of the coconut.
  2. Sip directly from the opening or pour the coconut water into a glass.

3. Savor the Goodness

  1. Take a moment to appreciate the tropical essence.
  2. Feel the cool liquid slide down your throat, replenishing your body.

Indulge in the simplicity of Dominica—sip coconut water under the swaying palms, and let the island’s rhythm wash over you. 🌴🥥🌊


Dominica Food – Souse 

Dominica Food - Souse 
Souse 

Dominican Souse: A Caribbean Delicacy

History and Background

Welcome to the vibrant island of Dominica, where lush rainforests meet pristine beaches, and the air is thick with the scent of spices. Our culinary journey today takes us to the heart of Caribbean comfort food—the beloved Dominican Souse.

This dish has deep roots in the island’s history, reflecting the fusion of African, European, and indigenous influences. As the trade winds carried ingredients across oceans, Dominica embraced them all, weaving them into its vibrant food tapestry.

Souse, with its rich flavors and hearty ingredients, embodies this harmonious blend.

Dominica Food – Souse Ingredients

  • 6 pieces of pig’s feet (boiled)
  • 3 cups water
  • 1 tablespoon salt
  • 2 tablespoons freshly squeezed lime or lemon juice
  • Fresh hot peppers (based on your threshold)
  • 1 tablespoon chopped parsley
  • 1 tablespoon chopped thyme leaves
  • 3 cloves of garlic (minced or chopped)
  • 1 head of scallion (chopped)

Dominica Food – Souse Recipe

1. Prepare the Pig’s Feet

  1. Boil the pig’s feet in a pressure cooker or large pot.
  2. Add garlic cloves and a little salt to the boiling water.
  3. Throw out all the water, remove imperfections, and rinse the pig’s feet.

2. Create the Flavorful Base

  1. In a bowl, combine water, chopped onions, minced garlic, salt, lime juice, parsley, thyme, scallions, and fresh hot peppers.
  2. Gently crush the ingredients against the sides of the bowl to allow them to commingle and distribute their flavors.

3. Marinate and Chill

  1. Add the boiled pig’s feet to the flavorful base.
  2. Let the souse marinate in the refrigerator for at least 1 hour.

4. Serve and Enjoy

  1. Serve the Dominican Souse chilled.
  2. Pair it with bread or bakes for a satisfying meal.

Indulge in the flavors of Dominica—the Dominican Souse is a taste of our island’s rich culinary heritage! 🇩🇲🍽️


Dominica Food – Cassava 

Dominica Food - Cassava 
Cassava 

Casabe: A Taste of Dominica’s Ancient Heritage

History and Background

Welcome to the sun-kissed shores of Dominica, where lush rainforests meet pristine beaches. Our culinary journey today takes us back in time to the heart of Caribbean history—the beloved Casabe.

This crispy flatbread, made from cassava (also known as yuca), has been a staple in our indigenous Taino diet for centuries. The Taino people brought cassava and the knowledge of making casabe from the mainland, spreading it across the Caribbean islands.

So important was this food to the Taino that their main god was called Yocahu Vagua Maorocoti, which roughly translates to “Our Great Lord of Yuca.” When the Spanish arrived, they discovered that casabe had advantages over European bread—it had a long shelf life and didn’t go stale or moldy.

In fact, it’s said that the conquest of the Americas was fueled by casabe, taken by the conquistadores from Hispaniola as they continued their push into Mexico and beyond.

Dominica Food – Cassava Ingredients

  • 1 large cassava (yuca) root
  • Water (for soaking)
  • Salt (optional, for flavor)

Dominica Food – Cassava Recipe

1. Prepare the Cassava

  1. Peel the cassava root and cut it into manageable pieces.
  2. Remove any fibrous strands from the cassava.

2. Grate and Soak

  1. Grate the cassava using a box grater or food processor.
  2. Soak the grated cassava in water for a few hours or overnight. This helps remove the natural toxins and makes it easier to work with.

3. Squeeze and Shape

  1. Drain the soaked cassava and squeeze out excess water.
  2. Shape the cassava into thin, round discs (about 6-8 inches in diameter).

4. Cook on a Hot Surface

  1. Heat a flat griddle or non-stick pan over medium heat.
  2. Place the cassava discs on the hot surface and cook until crispy and golden brown on both sides (about 5 minutes per side).

5. Serve and Enjoy

  1. Let the casabe cool slightly.
  2. Sprinkle with a pinch of salt if desired.
  3. Serve as a snack, appetizer, or alongside your favorite dish.

Indulge in the flavors of Dominica—the ancient wonder of casabe awaits! 🇩🇲🥖


Dominica Food – Braff 

Dominica Food - Braff 
Braff 

Braff: A Hearty Caribbean Stew

History and Background

Welcome to the vibrant island of Dominica, where lush rainforests meet pristine beaches, and the air is thick with the scent of spices. Our culinary journey today takes us to the heart of Caribbean comfort food—the beloved Braff.

This dish has deep roots in the island’s history, reflecting the fusion of African, European, and indigenous influences. As the trade winds carried ingredients across oceans, Dominica embraced them all, weaving them into its vibrant food tapestry. Braff, with its rich flavors and hearty ingredients, embodies this harmonious blend.

Dominica Food – Braff Ingredients

  • 1 lb salted codfish (soaked and desalted)
  • 1 lb yam (peeled and cubed)
  • 1 lb sweet potatoes (peeled and cubed)
  • 1 lb green bananas (peeled and sliced)
  • 1 lb dasheen (taro root, peeled and cubed)
  • 1 large onion (chopped)
  • 2 cloves garlic (minced)
  • 1 Scotch bonnet pepper (seeded and chopped)
  • 1 sprig thyme
  • 1 cup coconut milk
  • 2 tablespoons vegetable oil
  • Salt and pepper to taste

Dominica Food – Braff Recipe

1. Prepare the Salted Codfish

  1. Soak the salted codfish in water overnight to remove excess salt.
  2. Rinse and shred the codfish into small pieces.

2. Boil the Root Vegetables

  1. In a large pot, bring water to a boil.
  2. Add the yam, sweet potatoes, green bananas, and dasheen.
  3. Boil until tender but still firm.

3. Sauté the Aromatics

  1. Heat vegetable oil in a separate pot.
  2. Sauté the chopped onion, minced garlic, Scotch bonnet pepper, and thyme until fragrant.

4. Combine and Simmer

  1. Add the shredded codfish to the pot with the sautéed aromatics.
  2. Pour in the coconut milk.
  3. Season with salt and pepper.
  4. Add the boiled root vegetables.
  5. Simmer until flavors meld and the stew thickens.

5. Serve and Enjoy

  1. Serve Braff hot, with a side of crusty bread or rice.

Indulge in the flavors of Dominica—the Braff is a taste of our island’s rich culinary heritage! 🇩🇲🍲


Dominica Food – Los Tres Golpes Con Mangú 

Dominica Food - Los Tres Golpes Con Mangú 
Los Tres Golpes Con Mangú 

Los Tres Golpes Con Mangú: A Taste of Dominica

History and Background

Los Tres Golpes Con Mangú is a beloved Dominican breakfast dish that combines the flavors of the Caribbean with African and Spanish influences. The name translates to “The Three Hits with Mangú,” referring to the three main components of the dish. It’s a hearty and satisfying meal that has been enjoyed by generations of Dominicans.

Region of Origin: The Dominican Republic, located in the heart of the Caribbean, is known for its vibrant culture, beautiful beaches, and delicious cuisine. Los Tres Golpes Con Mangú is a staple in Dominican households, often served during special occasions or as a comforting morning meal.

Dominica Food – Los Tres Golpes Con Mangú Ingredients

  • Mangú:
    • 4 green plantains (unripe)
    • Water for boiling
    • Salt to taste
    • 2 tablespoons of butter
  • Salami Guisado (Stewed Salami):
    • 1 cup sliced salami (Dominican-style cured sausage)
    • 1 onion, finely chopped
    • 1 bell pepper, finely chopped
    • 2 cloves of garlic, minced
    • 1 tablespoon tomato paste
    • 1 teaspoon oregano
    • 1/2 cup water
    • Salt and pepper to taste
  • Queso Frito (Fried Cheese):
    • 1 cup of queso de freír (Dominican frying cheese) or any firm cheese suitable for frying
    • Vegetable oil for frying
  • Pickled Red Onions:
    • 1 red onion, thinly sliced
    • 1/2 cup white vinegar
    • 1/2 cup water
    • 1 teaspoon sugar
    • Salt and pepper to taste

Dominica Food – Los Tres Golpes Con Mangú Recipe

Mangú

  1. Peel the green plantains and cut them into chunks.
  2. Boil the plantains in salted water until tender (about 20 minutes).
  3. Drain the plantains and mash them with a fork or masher.
  4. Add butter and continue mashing until smooth.
  5. Serve the mangú hot.

Salami Guisado

  1. In a skillet, sauté the sliced salami until lightly browned.
  2. Add the chopped onion, bell pepper, and minced garlic. Cook until the vegetables are softened.
  3. Stir in the tomato paste, oregano, water, salt, and pepper.
  4. Simmer for 10-15 minutes until the flavors meld together.

Queso Frito

  1. Cut the queso de freír into thick slices.
  2. Heat vegetable oil in a pan over medium heat.
  3. Fry the cheese slices until golden brown on both sides.
  4. Drain on paper towels.

Pickled Red Onions

  1. Mix the sliced red onions, white vinegar, water, sugar, salt, and pepper in a bowl.
  2. Let it sit for at least 30 minutes to pickle.

Enjoy this flavorful Dominican breakfast and imagine yourself sitting by the turquoise waters of the Caribbean! 🌴🍽️


Dominica Food – Salami Frito 

Dominica Food - Salami Frito 
Salami Frito 

Salami Frito: A Flavorful Delight from Dominica

History and Background

Salami Frito is a mouthwatering dish that hails from the beautiful island of Dominica in the Caribbean. This flavorful creation combines the rich heritage of African, European, and indigenous Taíno influences. Imagine sitting by the turquoise waters, savoring the salty breeze, and indulging in this delightful treat.

Salami Frito is a beloved breakfast or brunch option, often enjoyed with family and friends.

Region of Origin: Dominica, known as the “Nature Isle of the Caribbean,” is famous for its lush rainforests, volcanic peaks, and warm hospitality. Salami Frito reflects the island’s vibrant culinary traditions and the fusion of cultures that have shaped its cuisine.

Dominica Food – Salami Frito Ingredients

  • Dominican-style Salami:
    • 1 cup sliced salami (look for a firm, cured sausage)
    • 1 onion, finely chopped
    • 1 bell pepper, finely chopped
    • 2 cloves of garlic, minced
    • 1 tablespoon tomato paste
    • 1 teaspoon dried oregano
    • 1/2 cup water
    • Salt and pepper to taste
  • Vegetable Oil for Frying
  • Optional Garnish:
    • Fresh parsley or cilantro, chopped

Dominica Food – Salami Frito Recipe

Prepare the Salami Guisado (Stewed Salami)

  1. In a skillet, sauté the sliced salami until it turns lightly browned and crispy.
  2. Add the finely chopped onion, bell pepper, and minced garlic. Cook until the vegetables are softened and aromatic.
  3. Stir in the tomato paste, dried oregano, water, salt, and pepper. Let the flavors meld together over low heat for about 10-15 minutes.

Fry the Salami

  1. Heat vegetable oil in a separate pan over medium heat.
  2. Carefully add the sautéed salami to the hot oil.
  3. Fry the salami slices until they are golden brown and crispy on both sides.
  4. Remove the fried salami from the oil and drain on paper towels.

Bon appétit! 🌴🍽️


Dominica Food – Queso Frito (fried Cheese) 

Dominica Food - Queso Frito (fried Cheese) 
Queso Frito (fried Cheese) 

Dominica Calling! Queso Frito – A Taste of Sunshine ☀️

Dominica, the “Nature Island” of the Caribbean, isn’t just about stunning scenery and volcanic wonders. It’s also a place where delicious flavors abound! Today, we’re taking a bite out of Dominica with a classic appetizer – Queso Frito, or fried cheese.

This simple dish is a staple across the Caribbean, but in Dominica, it takes on a special charm. Back at my restaurant, we love serving Queso Frito with a side of spicy Dominican chimichurri for a real taste of the island. Let’s get cooking!

A Bite-Sized History of Queso Frito

Queso Frito translates to “fried cheese,” and that’s exactly what it is! This dish is popular throughout Latin America and the Caribbean, with variations found in almost every country. Dominica’s version is no different. While the exact origins are unclear, it’s likely linked to Spanish and African influences on Dominican cuisine. Queso Frito is a great way to use up leftover cheese, and it’s perfect for a quick and satisfying snack.

Dominica Food – Queso Frito Ingredients (Serves 4)

  • 10 oz fresh queso blanco cheese (or queso fresco) – about 280 calories, 20g fat, 20g protein
  • 1 cup neutral oil (like canola or vegetable oil) – 120 calories per tbsp
  • 1/2 cup all-purpose flour – 120 calories per 1/4 cup
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt – 4 calories
  • Freshly ground black pepper, to taste

Dominica Food – Let’s Cook Up Some Queso Frito!

Prep Work

  1. Slice the Cheese: Cut the queso blanco cheese into thick slices, about 1/2 inch thick.
  2. Prepare the Coating: In a shallow bowl, whisk together the flour and salt.
  3. Heat the Oil: In a large skillet or pot, heat the oil over medium heat. You want the oil to be hot but not smoking (around 350°F).

Frying the Cheese

  1. Coating the Cheese: Dredge each cheese slice in the flour mixture, making sure to coat it evenly.
  2. Fry the Cheese: Carefully place the coated cheese slices into the hot oil. Don’t overcrowd the pan! Fry for 1-2 minutes per side, or until golden brown and crispy.
  3. Drain and Serve: Using a slotted spoon, transfer the fried cheese to a paper towel-lined plate to drain excess oil. Season with freshly ground black pepper, to taste.

Tips:

  • You can experiment with different types of cheese. Queso fresco or mozzarella can also be used.
  • For an extra kick, add a pinch of cayenne pepper to the flour mixture.
  • Serve Queso Frito hot with your favorite dipping sauce, like chimichurri, guava marmalade, or even a simple tomato sauce.

This simple recipe is a delicious way to experience a taste of Dominica. Queso Frito is perfect for a party appetizer, a quick snack, or even a fun side dish. So next time you’re looking for a taste of the Caribbean sunshine, give Queso Frito a try!


Dominica Food – Coffee Liqueur Flan 

Coffee Liqueur Flan: A Taste of Dominica

History and Background

Welcome to my cozy corner of the culinary world! Today, we’re embarking on a flavor-filled journey to the enchanting island of Dominica. Picture lush rainforests, pristine beaches, and a vibrant culture that dances to its own rhythm. It’s here, amidst swaying palm trees and the soothing hum of the Caribbean sea, that our delightful dessert tale begins.

Region of Origin: Dominica, affectionately known as the “Nature Isle of the Caribbean,” is a paradise for food lovers. Its cuisine is a harmonious blend of African, European, and indigenous influences. And what better way to celebrate this fusion than with a Coffee Liqueur Flan? This velvety dessert whispers secrets of the island’s history, echoing through generations of family gatherings and lazy Sunday afternoons.

Dominica Food – Coffee Liqueur Flan Ingredients

  • Caramel Coating:
    • 1/2 cup white granulated sugar
    • 1 tablespoon water (optional; see notes)
  • Coffee Flan:
    • 2 large eggs (or 3 medium eggs)
    • 1 cup whole milk
    • 1/2 cup sweetened condensed milk
    • 1/4 cup evaporated milk
    • 1 teaspoon instant coffee (you can use decaf if you prefer)
    • 1 tablespoon coffee liqueur (for a grown-up twist)
    • A pinch of salt

Dominica Food – Coffee Liqueur Flan Recipe

Prepare the Caramel Coating

  1. In a saucepan, melt the sugar over medium heat until it turns a rich golden color. Add water if needed to prevent burning.
  2. Pour the caramel into a mold or individual ramekins, swirling to coat the bottom evenly. Let it cool and harden.

Create the Coffee Flan Magic

  1. Preheat your oven to 350°F (180°C).
  2. In a mixing bowl, whisk together the eggs, whole milk, sweetened condensed milk, evaporated milk, instant coffee, coffee liqueur, and a pinch of salt.
  3. Strain the mixture through a fine-mesh sieve to ensure a silky-smooth texture.
  4. Pour the coffee flan mixture over the cooled caramel in the mold or ramekins.

Bake and Chill

  1. Place the mold or ramekins in a water bath (a larger baking dish filled with water) to create gentle, even heat.
  2. Bake for approximately 45 minutes or until the flan is set but still slightly jiggly in the center.
  3. Remove from the oven and let it cool completely. Then refrigerate for at least 2 hours (or overnight) to allow the flavors to meld.

Serving

  • Run a knife around the edges of the flan to loosen it.
  • Invert the mold onto a serving plate, allowing the caramel to cascade over the coffee-infused custard.
  • Serve chilled, savoring each spoonful of creamy goodness.

Buen provecho! 🌴🍮


Dominica Food – Pudín De Pan (Bread Pudding) 

Dominica Food - Pudín De Pan (Dominican Bread Pudding) 
Pudín De Pan (Dominican Bread Pudding) 

Pudín De Pan (Dominican Bread Pudding): A Flavorful Nostalgia

History and Background

Welcome to my cozy corner of the culinary world! Today, we’re embarking on a flavor-filled journey to the enchanting island of Dominica. Picture lush rainforests, pristine beaches, and a vibrant culture that dances to its own rhythm. It’s here, amidst swaying palm trees and the soothing hum of the Caribbean sea, that our delightful dessert tale begins.

Region of Origin: Dominica, affectionately known as the “Nature Isle of the Caribbean,” is a paradise for food lovers. Its cuisine is a harmonious blend of African, European, and indigenous influences. And what better way to celebrate this fusion than with a Pudín De Pan?

This Dominican bread pudding is so flavorful, thanks to its generous use of nutmeg and cinnamon. It really is a delight! Simple to make with straightforward ingredients, this recipe is a must-try. I promise that everyone will love it! 🌴🍮

Dominica Food – Pudín De Pan Ingredients

  • Bread Rolls:
    • Leftover bread rolls (about 6-8 rolls)
  • Whole Milk:
    • 2 cups
  • Evaporated Milk:
    • 1 cup
  • Condensed Milk:
    • 1 cup
  • Butter:
    • 2 tablespoons, melted
  • Eggs:
    • 3 large eggs
  • Vanilla Extract:
    • 1 teaspoon
  • Cinnamon:
    • 1 teaspoon
  • Nutmeg:
    • 1/2 teaspoon
  • Lime Zest:
    • Zest of 1 lime
  • Salt:
    • A pinch
  • Raisins:
    • 1/2 cup
  • Flour:
    • 2 tablespoons (for coating raisins)
  • Sugar:
    • 1 cup (for caramel)

Dominica Food – Pudín De Pan Recipe

Prepare the Bread Mixture

  1. Break down the bread rolls into small pieces and add them to a large mixing bowl.
  2. In a medium bowl, combine the whole milk, evaporated milk, and condensed milk. Heat the milk mixture in the microwave for 1 minute until just warm.
  3. Pour the milk mixture over the bread. Fold the milk and bread together, pressing on the bread to break it down further. Set it aside for about 10 minutes to allow the bread to soak up the milk mixture.

Prepare the Caramel

  1. Heat sugar in a small saucepan over medium heat, stirring constantly until melted and golden brown.
  2. Pour the caramel into a 9″ x 5″ loaf pan. Swirl it around the bottom and sides of the pan to coat.

Combine Ingredients

  1. Add melted butter to the bread mixture and fold to combine.
  2. In a separate bowl, whisk together eggs, vanilla extract, cinnamon, nutmeg, lime zest, and salt. Add it to the bread mixture and stir well.
  3. Coat the raisins with flour and add them to the bread mixture. This prevents the raisins from sinking to the bottom of the pan. Fold to combine.

Bake and Chill

  1. Pour the bread pudding mixture into the loaf pan.
  2. Place the loaf pan in a larger baking dish filled with hot water (water bath) to create gentle, even heat.
  3. Bake for 1 hour or until a table knife inserted in the middle comes out clean.
  4. Cool on a wire rack for about 30 minutes, then refrigerate for at least 4 hours.

Serving

  1. To unmold, place the bottom of the pan in warm water for about 5 minutes.
  2. Run a knife around the edges of the pan.
  3. Invert a serving plate over the loaf pan, hold it tightly, and quickly turn it over.
  4. Gently shake the mold to release.
  5. Refrigerate until serving time.

Buen provecho! 🌴🍮


Dominica Food – Tres Leches (Three-milk Cake)

Dominica Food - Tres Leches (Three-milk Cake)
Tres Leches (Three-milk Cake)

Tres Leches (Three-Milk Cake): A Sweet Symphony from Dominica

History and Background

Welcome to my cozy kitchen, where the aroma of nostalgia mingles with the flavors of the Caribbean. Today, we’re diving into the heart of Dominica, a land where lush rainforests whisper secrets and the sea cradles centuries-old traditions. Our star performer? The irresistible Tres Leches Cake, a symphony of sweetness that dances on your taste buds.

Region of Origin: Dominica, the “Nature Isle of the Caribbean,” boasts a culinary heritage as vibrant as its landscapes. Tres Leches Cake, or “Pastel de Tres Leches,” is a beloved classic here. Its roots trace back to Latin America, where the magic of three milks—sweetened condensed milk, evaporated milk, and whole milk—transforms a simple sponge cake into a heavenly delight.

Dominica Food – Tres Leches Ingredients

  • For Prepping the Pan:
    • 1 tablespoon salted butter (to grease the pan)
    • 1 tablespoon all-purpose flour (to dust the pan)
  • For the Cake Batter:
    • 3 medium eggs (separated into yolks and whites)
    • 1 cup white granulated sugar (divided)
    • 1⅓ cups all-purpose flour
    • 1 teaspoon baking powder
    • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
    • 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
    • ½ teaspoon ground nutmeg
    • Zest of 1 lime
    • A pinch of salt
  • For the Milk Soaking Sauce:
    • 1 cup sweetened condensed milk
    • 1 cup evaporated milk
    • 1 cup whole milk

Dominica Food – Tres Leches Recipe

Prepare the Cake Batter

  1. Preheat your oven to 350°F (175°C).
  2. Grease a 9″ x 13″ baking dish with butter and dust it with flour.
  3. In a large bowl, beat the egg yolks with half of the sugar until pale and creamy.
  4. Sift together the flour, baking powder, cinnamon, nutmeg, and salt. Add this dry mixture to the egg yolks, alternating with the whole milk. Mix until smooth.
  5. In a separate bowl, beat the egg whites with the remaining sugar until stiff peaks form.
  6. Gently fold the egg whites into the cake batter.
  7. Pour the batter into the prepared pan and bake for about 35 minutes or until a toothpick inserted comes out clean.

Create the Milk Soaking Sauce

  1. While the cake is baking, combine the sweetened condensed milk, evaporated milk, and whole milk in a bowl.
  2. Once the cake is out of the oven, poke it all over with a fork or skewer.
  3. Pour the milk mixture evenly over the warm cake. Let it soak for at least 2 hours (or overnight) in the refrigerator.

Serving

  1. Slice the Tres Leches Cake into squares or rectangles.
  2. Serve each piece with a generous dollop of whipped cream or a sprinkle of ground cinnamon.
  3. Enjoy the moist, milky goodness!

Buen provecho! 🌴🍰


Dominica Food – Bizcocho Dominicano (Dominica Cake) 

Dominica Food - Bizcocho Dominicano (Dominica Cake) 
Bizcocho Dominicano (Dominica Cake) 

Bizcocho Dominicano (Dominican Cake): A Flavorful Nostalgia

History and Background

Welcome to my cozy corner of the culinary world! Today, we’re embarking on a flavor-filled journey to the enchanting island of Dominica. Picture lush rainforests, pristine beaches, and a vibrant culture that dances to its own rhythm. It’s here, amidst swaying palm trees and the soothing hum of the Caribbean sea, that our delightful dessert tale begins.

Region of Origin: Dominica, affectionately known as the “Nature Isle of the Caribbean,” is a paradise for food lovers. Its cuisine is a harmonious blend of African, European, and indigenous influences. And what better way to celebrate this fusion than with a Bizcocho Dominicano?

This Dominican cake is so special because it’s incredibly delicate in texture and sinfully delicious. It’s the kind of cake that virtually dissolves in your mouth, leaving you craving more. No wonder it’s a staple at every Dominican birthday, wedding, or festivity!

Dominica Food – Bizcocho Dominicano Ingredients

  • Prepping the Pan:
    • 1 tablespoon salted butter (to grease the pan)
    • 1 tablespoon all-purpose flour (to dust the pan)
  • Cake Batter:
    • 3 medium eggs (separated into yolks and whites)
    • 1 cup white granulated sugar (divided)
    • 1⅓ cups all-purpose flour
    • 1 teaspoon baking powder
    • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
    • 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
    • ½ teaspoon ground nutmeg
    • Zest of 1 lime
    • A pinch of salt
  • Milk Soaking Sauce:
    • 1 cup sweetened condensed milk
    • 1 cup evaporated milk
    • 1 cup whole milk

Dominica Food – Bizcocho Dominicano Recipe

Prepare the Cake Batter

  1. Preheat your oven to 350°F (175°C).
  2. Grease a 9″ x 13″ baking dish with butter and dust it with flour.
  3. In a large bowl, beat the egg yolks with half of the sugar until pale and creamy.
  4. Sift together the flour, baking powder, cinnamon, nutmeg, and salt. Add this dry mixture to the egg yolks, alternating with the whole milk. Mix until smooth.
  5. In a separate bowl, beat the egg whites with the remaining sugar until stiff peaks form.
  6. Gently fold the egg whites into the cake batter.
  7. Pour the batter into the prepared pan and bake for about 35 minutes or until a toothpick inserted comes out clean.

Create the Milk Soaking Sauce

  1. While the cake is baking, combine the sweetened condensed milk, evaporated milk, and whole milk in a bowl.
  2. Once the cake is out of the oven, poke it all over with a fork or skewer.
  3. Pour the milk mixture evenly over the warm cake. Let it soak for at least 2 hours (or overnight) in the refrigerator.

Serving

  1. Slice the Bizcocho Dominicano into squares or rectangles.
  2. Serve each piece with a generous dollop of whipped cream or a sprinkle of ground cinnamon.
  3. Enjoy the moist, milky goodness!

Buen provecho! 🌴🍰


Conclusion  

Dominica’s cuisine is a vibrant reflection of the island’s rich history, diverse geography, and unique climate. The blend of African, European, and indigenous influences has created a culinary tradition that is both flavorful and culturally significant.

The island’s fertile soil and abundant rainfall provide an array of fresh, local ingredients, from tropical fruits and root vegetables to a variety of seafood. Traditional cooking methods and a careful balance of spices and herbs bring these ingredients to life, creating dishes that are hearty, aromatic, and deeply satisfying.

By exploring Dominica’s food, you’re not just tasting delicious dishes—you’re experiencing a piece of the island’s soul. From the bustling street food scenes in cities like Roseau and Portsmouth to the comforting flavors of home-cooked meals, Dominica’s cuisine offers a rich and engaging culinary journey.

Whether you’re enjoying crispy accras, savoring a bowl of callaloo soup, or indulging in sweet cassava bread, each bite tells a story of the island’s heritage and natural bounty. Embrace the essence of Dominica’s cuisine and let its flavors transport you to the heart of the Caribbean.

FAQ’s

8 Frequently Asked Questions About Dominica’s Cuisine

1. What are the main influences on Dominica’s cuisine?

Dominica’s cuisine is influenced by a blend of African, European, and indigenous cultures. African slaves brought traditional cooking techniques and ingredients, which merged with French and British culinary influences during colonization. The indigenous Kalinago people also contributed to the island’s food culture, using native ingredients and cooking methods.

2. What are some popular dishes in Dominica?

Popular dishes in Dominica include callaloo soup, accras (fish fritters), bakes and saltfish, goat water stew, and sancoche (a thick vegetable soup). These dishes showcase the island’s diverse flavors and reflect its rich cultural heritage.

3. What ingredients are commonly used in Dominican cuisine?

Common ingredients in Dominican cuisine include root vegetables like yams, sweet potatoes, and cassava, as well as tropical fruits such as mangoes, bananas, and coconuts. Seafood is also prevalent, with fish, crab, and lobster being staples in many dishes.

Spices like thyme, bay leaves, and hot peppers add depth and flavor to Dominican recipes.

4. Is Dominican food spicy?

Dominican food can be spicy, but the level of heat varies depending on the dish and personal preference. Hot peppers, such as scotch bonnets, are commonly used to add a fiery kick to many recipes.

However, not all Dominican dishes are spicy, and there are plenty of options for those who prefer milder flavors.

5. What is a typical Dominican breakfast?

A typical Dominican breakfast often includes hearty dishes like bakes and saltfish, fried plantains, or a warm bowl of porridge made from cornmeal or oats. Fresh fruit juices, coconut water, or tea are popular beverage choices to accompany breakfast.

6. Are there vegetarian or vegan options in Dominican cuisine?

Yes, there are vegetarian and vegan options available in Dominican cuisine. Many dishes feature an abundance of plant-based ingredients such as root vegetables, beans, legumes, and tropical fruits. Some popular vegetarian dishes include callaloo soup, roasted breadfruit, and coconut-based curries.

7. What desserts are popular in Dominica?

Popular desserts in Dominica include sweet treats like coconut turnovers, cassava pone (a dense cake made from grated cassava), and banana fritters. These desserts often highlight the island’s tropical fruits and use ingredients like coconut milk and spices for added flavor.

8. Can I find street food in Dominica?

Yes, street food is a vibrant part of Dominica’s culinary scene. In towns and cities across the island, you’ll find street vendors selling a variety of local delicacies, from savory accras and fried plantains to refreshing coconut water and fruit juices.

Exploring Dominica’s street food is a delicious way to experience the island’s flavors and culture firsthand.


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